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UK, Fragile people are even more vulnerable in a cashless society





Homeless in Norwich.  Evelyn Simak, Creative Commons.
Homeless in Norwich. Evelyn Simak, Creative Commons.
Moving entirely to electronic payment systems will endanger survivors of domestic violence and alienate the elderly, campaigners have warned.
The UK is in “grave danger” of leaving survivors of domestic violencethe elderly  and millions of others without a “vital lifeline” if it continues to race towards a cashless society, campaigners have warned.
As lockdown restrictions have eased in recent months, Britons have enjoyed spending money at a wider variety of retailers, restaurants and entertainment venues and have also seen the limit for contactless card payments raised to £100.
Yet the widespread switch to accepting only card payments toward the start of the pandemic has created a retail landscape where many businesses prefer not to deal with cash.

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The cashless society from an ethical point of view

The debate about the move towards a cashless society has been at the center of the scene for several years, now. Various angles have been taken by economists, politicians, banking institutions and sociologists. Beyond the technicalities of the debate, lies the question of freedom, of inter-citizen solidarity and of governmental responsibility. The debate cannot remain in the hands of financial specialists, it is first and foremost an ethical, political and societal issue.










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