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The philadelphia city council will ban cashless stores.





The philadelphia city council will ban cashless stores.
If you want to get a coffee at Bluestone Lane, across the street from City Hall, you’ll have to bring a credit card. Along with a handful of other restaurants in town, most of them based in Center City, this high-end coffee chain does not accept cash. But Councilman William Greenlee thinks that very idea is classist. He introduced a bill that would outlaw the practice in Philadelphia, specifically citing Bluestone Lane and the fast-salad chain Sweetgreen as examples of cashless offenders. “To me, it borders on discrimination,” said Greenlee. “It [hurts] the lower income person who might not have a credit card, or the immigrant, or the young person who hasn’t gotten a credit card yet. Right now, they can’t go get a sandwich at [Sweetgreen] and I can? Something seems wrong with that.”

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The cashless society from an ethical point of view

The debate about the move towards a cashless society has been at the center of the scene for several years, now. Various angles have been taken by economists, politicians, banking institutions and sociologists. Beyond the technicalities of the debate, lies the question of freedom, of inter-citizen solidarity and of governmental responsibility. The debate cannot remain in the hands of financial specialists, it is first and foremost an ethical, political and societal issue.

The cashless society from an ethical point of view









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