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Sweden's 'cashless society' affects international residents





Sweden's 'cashless society' affects international residents
Fewer and fewer Swedes use cash in their daily lives, but for international residents struggling to set up a bank account or platforms such as Swish, the cashless society can be a headache. The Local asked our readers what they think.
In 2010 nearly 40 percent of Swedes said they paid for their most recent purchase in cash.
By 2018 that proportion had drastically decreased to 13 percent, according to the Swedish Central Bank.
When The Local asked our readers what payment method they prefer, an overwhelming majority said card. But many also highlighted the unique problems international residents face in the cashless society.
Gabriel Pavico, who moved to Sweden from the Philippines for university, said that although he thought being able to pay by card so regularly had made his life easier, he had encountered two specific problems.

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The cashless society from an ethical point of view

The debate about the move towards a cashless society has been at the center of the scene for several years, now. Various angles have been taken by economists, politicians, banking institutions and sociologists. Beyond the technicalities of the debate, lies the question of freedom, of inter-citizen solidarity and of governmental responsibility. The debate cannot remain in the hands of financial specialists, it is first and foremost an ethical, political and societal issue.

The cashless society from an ethical point of view









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