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Living in a Cashless Society is not that convenient





Living in a Cashless Society is not that convenient
Just last week we purchased lunch from a local eatery.

We dug deep into the recesses of our wallet, searching for some money to complete the transaction. Eventually we scrambled together enough $1 and $2 coins to pay for the fare.

"Oh, you're not using a card,'' the youngster behind the counter exclaimed, somewhat incredulously. "No,'' we replied defiantly and proudly.

"It's cash only for us.''

An awkward silence followed.

Other customers looked concerned as they shuffled towards the door, perhaps fearing they were in the company of some type of fanatic. For no-one pays in cash anymore or so it seems. Or no-one except this correspondent.

Now there's even further bad news. Our bank contacted us late last year. In their wisdom our bank has decided to phase out bank books. The reason was never explained, or if it was, we weren't listening. However, from June 1 (we think), bank books will be relegated to the sin bin, like black and white television and Coalition climate policies.

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The cashless society from an ethical point of view

The debate about the move towards a cashless society has been at the center of the scene for several years, now. Various angles have been taken by economists, politicians, banking institutions and sociologists. Beyond the technicalities of the debate, lies the question of freedom, of inter-citizen solidarity and of governmental responsibility. The debate cannot remain in the hands of financial specialists, it is first and foremost an ethical, political and societal issue.










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